SALE - $125 Off Backordered Stoves - Limited Time Only

SHOP STOVES

Small Space Case Studies

Megan's Tiny House in North Carolina

"I love my stove! Its so incredibly cozy. I get so excited to use it when the weather starts to turn."

Ben’s Tiny House

"We lived in a 3300 sq ft home during the winter we were paying up to $500 a month to heat our home now I can heat my home with sticks my dog leaves lying around!"

Skoolie living in Montana

"Quality product and real person customer service."

Gary’s Yurt in Colorado

"The stove itself is very high quality as are all the flue pipe components. Customer service was really great too!"

Jill's Tiny House Homestead

"We have had a great time enjoying our wood stove. The stove does work very well even in the high winds that we get on a weekly basis. "

A Writing Cabin in the Woods – Timberhomes VT

"It is a beautiful, efficient stove, and the 'work' of keeping the fire going with its small logs is a mindful, lovely, satisfying task."

Traveling with kids in a vintage trailer - @roaming.nomads

"There are so many reasons we enjoy the stove, from keeping us warm in incredibly cold climates, to drying all our snow gear in a matter of half an hour to re-heating my coffee on cold mornings and cuddling to a fire at night."

Oli’s Yurt

"The tiny wood stoves are attractive, compact and functional."

Vintage Airstream life with three four kids – @weelittlenomads

" We love the ability to move our home to new locations in ideal temperatures, and the closeness it has cultivated for our family is the greatest part"

Jay’s Off-Grid Tiny House Writers Retreat – @jstallz

"The Dwarf Stove works like a charm and heats my tiny home quickly and efficiently."

Michaels Japanese inspired Tiny House

"Setting up the stove with a friend was a piece of angel food cake"

The one-of-a-kind adventure rig -@basillynch

"I loved the practicality of the stove. It's small, robust and easy to use."

Francesca and Nicholas and three dogs - Skoolie life @happyhomebodies

"We love the idea of being able to pick up our home and move wherever we want or need to go."

The Kerr Family – Airstream living @demibrooke

"Anyone who came into our Airstream commented on how it felt like a home with the wood stove."

Jay and Abby's Off-Grid Adventure Van — @imaginalbud

"There is a sense of home that comes with having a wood stove in your living space."

Brent and Lindsey's Shuttle Bus Escape — @shuttle_and_crew

"The ability to have a warm flickering fire makes our space feel like home no matter where we are parked."

Steve's minimalistic cargo trailer

"It's functional, attractive, easy to install with great product support."

Brett and Natasha's Cozy Tiny Homestead— @sugarhousehomestead

"We have a craving for beauty and adventure and freedom—and if you're not loaded, you have to find creative ways of pulling that off."

Ben and Meag's Debt-Free Happy Bus — @wilddrivelife

"We wanted our next step to be something of our own, unattached to any one location or schedule ..."

Master Wood Worker's Exquisite Custom Tiny House—@bjmacwoodwork

"We live in a very expensive part of the world, and this lifestyle has afforded us financial freedom—the ability to live debt free."

Dwarf Stoves on TV

Tiny House Nation S5E15

“344 Sq Ft Tiny Tech-Fee Retreat”

Tiny House Big Living S7E6

“Artistic and Idyllic Tiny Escape”

Tiny House Big Living S6E9

“Tiny Tech Compound”

Building Alaska S8E8

“Jeff Erickson – Granite Bay Cliffside Retreat”

2 thoughts on “Case Studies”

  1. Hello! Back in August, I bought a Tiny Wood Stove from this business. What a Treasure!! What a Blessing!!
    I live in the mountains of Tennessee, and even though it doesn’t usually get below 0′ F, it does often get below freezing. I have already had many fires in my little stove. I have learned some little ‘tricks’ about the small stove compared to bigger stoves.
    1. All that small wood that most people overlook or only use as kindling? Yes, the small stove works Great on those. If you need an idea of the length of wood you need? Just think of a tube from a paper towel roll. Nothing longer than that can fit, and that size can really only fit crosswise. I Glean a Lot of wood from fallen branches. Have not had to cut down any trees yet. Just using up from the stacks of fallen branches that have been made over the years since I had a wood stove.
    2. A Wood stove Thermometer is a Really Good item to have. It is hard to gauge if you have your fire going good enough or hot enough by feel alone. The thermometer lets you know if you should get it burning just a bit hotter to help prevent that creosote build up.
    3. Speaking of Creosote, it is a little too easy to build up creosote in this stove. Perhaps because of my location and Not needing a hot hot fire? More than likely there are several reasons. Backing up, I am gleaning from Old tree branches that have fallen in previous years, so all my wood is over a year old. Some just falls apart when I pick it up. So, not burning green wood … at all. I think the creosote is building up because I usually just need a fire to get chill out and don’t get fire hot enough. That is what the thermometer is showing anyway.
    That being said, I have tried a few Creosote buster products. The creosote logs need to be sawed into at least 3 pieces just so they fit and burn up. So, not a good option. Rutland makes a good Powder that comes with a scoop and can be tossed onto hot coals. This works pretty well. If you don’t want to mess with the powder, Rutland also make small cylinders that can be tossed in. They work well too and are easy with less mess.
    4. Small billows are a wonderful tool to have on hand to boost that low burning fire back up to creosote burning level. Tractor & Supply carry nice small ones for under $20 here.
    5. Fan(s). When I bought the stove, I bought a little fan to go with it. The kind that when it heats up, the fan blows. This is a Wonderful tool as well. The stove is within sight from almost anywhere in my tiny home ( my home is 10 ft x 16 ft, with a small loft, so less than 200 sq ft) so I watch for those fan blades to start slowing down. As soon as they do, I know I better get up and add wood, unless I am letting fire go out.

    Overall, I am Just So Happy to have been Blessed with this stove! Thank You So Very Much! Your staff were Wonderful to work with! So patient and kind! Never made me feel stupid when I had a question.
    May God Bless you with this business, You get top stars from me!

    1. Hi Juanita! Thank you so much for your feedback.  So glad to hear you’re enjoying your wood stove in your tiny home.

      To your issue regarding creosote — I agree that building lots of cool fires will cause creosote buildup much faster.  Periodic use of creosote remover can help, but it’s no substitute for mechanical sweeping.  We like to use a rotary chimney cleaner kit that attaches to your drill, which gives your flue system a thorough scrubbing in just one or two passes. You can find our favorite creosote remover and rotary cleaner kit in the Accessories section of the store.

      Keep in mind that downed wood might still not be properly cured even if it’s been down for a year.  The structure of the wood and its bark can slow drying quite a bit.  That’s why the clock on curing doesn’t start moving very quickly until the wood is chopped and stacked.  That’s not to say that whole branches and logs don’t dry out naturally—they do, just slower.  The best way to know if your wood is properly cured is with a wood moisture meter, which we also have in the Accessories section of the store.

      Even if you do have wet wood, though, the cooler burning or smoldering fires are more likely the cause of creosote buildup.  Wet or improperly cured wood isn’t impossible to burn clean, it’s just more difficult since the water absorbs a significant amount of heat.

      My suggestion for days when you’re just trying to take the chill off and watch the fire, is to get the stove up to temperature quickly, and then let the fire die down to coals.  Then, instead of feeding the fire with larger logs and tightening down the air controls, add smaller logs more frequently with more open air controls.

      Just getting the stove and flue system up to temperature once a day will help reduce creosote buildup, and keeping your air controls more open will help avoid smoldering fires.

      As always, feel free to drop me a line at support@tinywoodstove.com if there’s anything else I can do to help in the future.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Scroll to Top